Retreat wiki

Retreat wiki

 

Open as a way of working is spreading well beyond the world of technology. Open source software. Open public policy. Open art. Open music. Open space events. Open networks. Open philanthropy. This is at once disruptive and transformational – a new way of working.  The Open Everything retreat is for the people who are making this happen. It’s about helping us take our work to the next level, giving us the tools and insights to spread this work further and faster.


What’s the big idea?

Our goal is to gather the brightest minds that think about and play with open. The coders. The educators. The activists. We want to know what is and isn’t working,  what it all does and doesn’t have in common, and what can we learn from one another. This is, to our knowledge, the first effort to look at open across fields. Building on this, we want to know what are there common thread and what are the opportunities for open. Is open a movement? A methodology? An ideal? All of these things? Let’s have an open debate.


Notes from the Meeting?

Look for live links in this Agenda…  


What will we talk about?

The agenda will unfold in three tracks — the meaning of open, open leadership and examples of open. Some talks proposed so far include:

There will also be a large number of discussion oriented sessions aimed at helping each other become better at leading open projects. See the draft agenda to see how this is shaping up. Write to us or post to the wiki if you have a session idea.


What will we take away?

The aim of Open Everything is to both explore the principles at the core of ‘open’ and to improve the game of people using open strategies in their work. We are hoping to leave Hollyhock with:

  • A clear narrative about ‘what is open?’ for us explain what we are doing to confused colleagues and family members.
  • Concrete examples that show open strategies in everything from software to education to government.
  • Feedback and coaching that offer practical advice on how to make our open organizations and networks better.
  • New friends who are doing practical, interesting and crazy things to build ‘open’ into their work.
  • Maybe (just maybe) a manifesto that explains why open matters, and why it’s not just tech.

We are also planning to take away a pile of documentation: video, podcasts, blogs, case writeups. This info will be posted to www.openeverything.net … and will be threaded together with ideas from a series of shorter Open Everything events happening in cities around the world.


Who’s coming?

This is a list of people who have *registered* for open everything:

  1. Allen Gunn, Aspiration and particaptory event innovator
  2. Ahrash Bissell, CC Learn director, Creative Commons global 
  3. David Eaves, negotiation and public policy expert
  4. Erika Bjune, VP Technology, Tides Foundation
  5. Gale Moore, Knowledge Media and Design Institute, University of Toronto
  6. Jason Cote, Freeform Solutions and prospective open leader
  7. Joel Solomon, Renewal Partners/Endswell/Tides Canada, open philanthropy and ecosystem building guru 
  8. Julia Watson, Communicopia, Web of Change, and meditation teacher
  9. Helen King, Shuttleworth Foundation CEO 
  10. Zaheda Bhorat, Community developer and change agent, managing Open Standards Office@Google
  11. Jennifer Bell, found of VisableGovernment.ca[1]
  12. Mark Graham, iVillage, VP of Technology
  13. Mark Surman, Shuttleworth Foundation and agitator for everything open
  14. Michael Lewkowitz, accomplished venturer exploring the frontiers of the great remix
  15. Paul Biondich, Open Medical Records System
  16. Scott Mattoon, Sun and Open Architecture Network
  17. Steve Wright, Salesforce.com Foundation
  18. Wayne Mackintosh, Commonswealth of Learning and WikiEducator.org
  19. Zak Greant, Mozilla Foundation and free software evangelist
  20. Danese Cooper, Open Source Initiative and Intel Open Source Technology Group
  21. Ross McMillan, CEO, Tides Canada Foundation
  22. Chris Watkins, Appropedia.org
  23. Peter Cowan, Natural Resources Canada
  24. Ed Murfitt, bravenewcollaboration.com
  25. Menka Parekh, bravenewcollaboration.com
  26. Jeff Balin, executive coach who helps people align their work and their values
  27. Holmes Wilson, Participatory Culture Foundation
  28. Rick Ingrasci, Hollyhock and Web of Change veteran
  29. Amanda McPherson, Linux Foundation
  30. Kris KrügRaincity Studios, Static Photography, Vancouver Film School
  31. Rob Cameron, COSTAR @ SFU / International Characters
  32. Richard Civille, community technology activist

 


Logistics and costs

  • People arrive on September 3 by late afternoon. We have dinner at 6:30 and opening circle at 8pm that night.
  • The event ends after lunch on September 6th to allow people to get back to Vancouver that day.
  • Tuition is $395 per person, plus food and accomodation.
  • Food and accomodation ranges from tents ($77) to super nice private rooms ($200). See here.
  • We have a handful of tuition scholarships to offer to people who really need them.
  • Getting to Hollyhock is a bit of an adventure. See here to make it easier.

Presented by:

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Sponsors:

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